Do You Need to Seal Granite Countertops?

Do You Need to Seal Granite Countertops?

Do You Need to Seal Granite Countertops?

Posted by Stone Care Experts | March 15, 2017 | Granite Countertops

Granite is a gorgeous natural stone material that many homeowners covet. It can be used on a wide range of surfaces in the home, and it is most commonly used as a countertop material in kitchens and bathrooms. Available in many different colors and styles, the variety makes it suitable for many homes regardless of décor. It also has an incredibly luxurious appeal and long-lasting durability that adds value and appeal to the home. In addition to cleaning, granite requires regular care and maintenance if you want it to provide you with decades of impressive use in the home. One of the most important steps to take is to seal the granite regularly.

Why You Need to Seal Granite Countertops

Because granite is a very hard natural stone material, you may think it would withstand all types of wear and tear you impose on it. However, if unsealed, acidic substances can easily deteriorate the stone over time. Etching may occur through exposure to acidic cleaning agents such as vinegar as well as everyday household items like lemon juice, and stains can occur from various food substances that have color in them. Sealing the granite is a great way to protect the stone from unnecessary exposure to these common elements. However, water, acidic substances, and even general use can wear away the seal, and it will need to be reapplied periodically.

How Frequently Should You Seal Granite Countertops?

Some granite countertops are sealed at the time of installation, which means you might not have to worry about sealing them again right away. However, the frequency900 with which you need apply new sealant can vary based on the type of sealant used and type of stone you have. In addition, exposure to acidic substances plays a role in frequency of sealing. Some homeowners seal their granite every year, and others do it every three to four months. However, it’s important to note you cannot over-seal stone, so it’s best to err on the side of caution and seal it as frequently as possible. You can perform a water test on the counter to determine how quickly water is absorbed into the stone. Pour water (about 3 inches in diameter) in several locations and let it sit for 30 minutes. If the water has created a dark mark or ring, the time has come to seal your counters.

The care and maintenance of granite is critical to its long-lasting use in your home, which means it is important to choose the right materials for cleaning, sealing, and polishing. Take the time to determine if your granite needs to be resealed, then order Granite Gold Sealer®, an easy-to-apply, spray-and-wipe granite sealer. These steps will ensure your granite continues to be a beautiful feature in your home for years to come. If you have additional questions about sealing granite, get in touch with Granite Gold® today at 1-800-475-STONE.

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