How to Get Rid of Dish Soap Rings on Granite Counters

How to Get Rid of Dish Soap Rings on Granite Counters

How to Get Rid of Dish Soap Rings on Granite Counters

Posted by The Lennys | October 6, 2017 | Granite Cleaning, Stone Care Blog
Getting Rid of Dish Soap Rings on Granite Counters

If liquid dish soap has left an unsightly stain or ring on your granite countertops, it’s a sign your granite needs to be resealed. Soap rings can be very stubborn because they occur when the porous stone absorbs the water and soap residue. To remove the stains, you will need to lift them out of the stone with a special formula or poultice. Here are the most effective ways to banish stubborn soap rings from your beautiful granite countertops. 

Use a Wet Sponge

Sometimes lifting a soap ring is as easy as leaving a wet sponge on top of the stain for a couple of days. Once the sponge is dry, you may find that the water alone lifted the soap scum out of the granite. This method is a good first start to removing soap rings, but it’s not always effective. 

Create a Baking Soda Poultice

A poultice is simply an absorbent material that can soak up a stain when left on a surface. Baking soda makes an excellent neutral poultice. Because some soaps contain oils, the baking soda should be combined with acetone to penetrate the stone. 

Make a paste of baking soda with a bit of acetone. Apply to the stain and cover with plastic wrap. Leave it covered for at least 24 hours until the baking soda is dry. This usually takes more than one attempt before it is successful. Once the stain is lifted, you must immediately reseal the stone.

Seal Your Granite

Granite that is not sealed is far more likely to develop stains, especially from soap. Sealing your granite closes the pores of the stone to prevent liquids from penetrating the surface. 

If you’re unsure how to seal natural stone, you can seal it yourself in a few easy steps. Start by cleaning the granite well with a granite cleaner. Dry the surface with a clean cloth, then spray the sealer directly onto the stone. Work in 3-foot sections and immediately buff the sealer into the stone with a clean cloth. Continue buffing until the surface is dry to the touch before moving on to the next area. When you seal stone, it’s important to buff to a dry finish to prevent cloudiness.

After you’ve sealed your stone and cleaned it, you can also use a granite polish to enhance its shine and luster. Granite Gold Polish® is safe to use on granite, marble, quartz, and more. To learn more about caring for natural-stone surfaces, get in touch with Granite Gold® today at 1-800-475-STONE.

Lenny Sciarrino (aka Lenny S) and Lenny Pellegrino (aka Lenny P) grew up in the family business and are co-founders of Granite Gold®.

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