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5 Strategies for Disinfecting Granite & Other Types of Natural Stone

5 Strategies for Disinfecting Granite & Other Types of Natural Stone

5 Strategies for Disinfecting Granite & Other Types of Natural Stone

Posted by Stone Care Experts | October 13, 2017 | Disinfecting, Stone Care Blog
Techniques Used to Disinfect Granite and Other Natural Stones

All types of natural stone, including slate, granite, and marble, are naturally resistant to bacteria and microbes, some more than others. Still, you can take steps to prevent germs from living in the pores and crevices of your stone. If you want to learn how to disinfect granite and natural stone, here are 5 easy tips. 

1. Kill Germs with Soap and Water

Combination products that promise to clean and disinfect typically leave streaks, and they can be harmful on granite, marble, travertine, and other types of natural stone. Instead, mix mild antibacterial dish soap with warm water and apply to the surface. Once this step is completed, use Granite Gold Daily Cleaner® or Granite Gold All-Surface Wipes® to prevent or remove streaks.

2. Use a Daily Stone-Safe Cleaner

In addition to causing streaks, another downside to using soap daily to clean your counters is that it can cause a buildup of soap scum that dulls the surface of your stone. While safe and easy, soap isn’t the best way to regularly disinfect natural-stone countertops. However, an even bigger downside to using soap is that it isn’t formulated to clean natural stone. Thus, the stone doesn’t get cleaned. A granite cleaner is recommended for daily cleaning.

3. Know Which Ingredients to Avoid

If sanitation is a concern, make sure you’re using only stone-safe cleaning products to avoid damaging the stone. Everyday household cleaners can damage limestone, marble, and travertine along with other types of stone. Vinegar, while effective at killing some pathogens, can also cause etching in natural stone and should be avoided.

4. Discourage Bacteria on the Surface

To minimize contamination on your countertops, always use cutting boards and clean the countertops before preparing food. You should also seal your stone regularly to close the pores that may harbor bacteria. 

5. Make Sure the Stone Is Sealed

Even though natural stone is resistant to bacteria, you should still maintain a good seal on the surface. Sealing your stone closes the pores and small crevices where bacteria can hide, and it also helps it resist absorbing liquids and developing stubborn stains. You can apply sealer regularly on your own. Choose a high-quality stone sealer like Granite Gold Sealer® and apply directly to the stone in three-foot sections. Buff the sealer into the stone immediately using a soft cloth. Continue buffing until the surface is dry before moving on to the next section.

To learn more about caring for natural stone in the home, reach out to the Stone Care Experts at Granite Gold®. We are a family company with a long history of stone care expertise dating back to the 1950s. Call 1-800-475-STONE today.

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