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How Long Do You Need to Wait After Sealing a Granite Countertop?

How Long Do You Need to Wait After Sealing a Granite Countertop?

How Long Do You Need to Wait After Sealing a Granite Countertop?

Waiting After Sealing Granite Countertops San Diego, CA

When you install granite countertops in your kitchen or bathroom, periodic sealing is something you’ll have to get used to if you want to protect your investment against stains and etches and keep it looking like new. A sealant application is the final step of the countertop installation process. Once this is completed, resealing will be up to you, and it should be made a part of regular maintenance.

Unlike cleaning and polishing, sealing requires not using the surface at all for 2 hours and waiting 24 hours before polishing to allow the sealer time to cure. Here’s what you need to know about how to seal granite and why the sealant should be allowed to cure.

Why You Need to Seal Granite

The protective seal contractors apply during the installation will wear off over time. The purpose of keeping a strong seal is to protect the surface from damage such as staining and etching. Like all other types of natural stone, granite has a certain level of porosity, and it’s a metamorphic rock that will chemically react with many substances, including water. With granite your need to maximize surface protection with periodic sealing.

The Proper Way to Apply Sealant

Granite sealer is easy to use. Once you’ve cleaned the countertops with Granite Gold Daily Cleaner®, make sure the surface is completely dry. Spray the sealant in three-foot sections, then wipe quickly with a lint-free cloth and apply enough pressure to work the sealer right into the granite. Since Granite Gold Sealer® is water-based, it will dry when you buff it into the stone with a separate clean, dry cloth.

Watch this quick video showing the proper way to seal granite countertops:

Waiting for the Sealant to Cure

Uniformity is the key to a successful sealant application. You need to wait at least a couple of hours to see if the sealer was evenly distributed. If you see a few spots that seem to be streaked or lighter than others, you may have inadvertently missed them when wiping into the surface. Make sure to take care of these spots and wait another two hours before placing objects such as blenders, food processors, and ornaments on the countertop. If possible, let the sealant cure overnight before returning these objects, but an absolute 24 hours must pass before the surface can be polished.

Polishing After Sealing

Wait 24 hours before you apply Granite Gold Polish® to your freshly sealed countertops. You shouldn’t have any problems with streaking, but make sure you spread the polish and buff it evenly across the surface. Even if the surface finish isn’t honed, Granite Gold Polish® can give your stone a nice gloss.

Granite Gold Sealer® and all other products provided by Granite Gold® are safe to use on all types of natural stone, including granite, marble, slate, and travertine. To find our products at a store near you, use our handy Store Locator. If you have any questions about caring for natural stone, call the Stone Care Experts today at 1-800-475-STONE (7866).

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